Fountains of hope in Ghana

Ellie Tang, HSBC Water Programme Asia Pacific Regional Coordinator

In Ghana, the issues of water and sanitation have been overlooked by the government and the public. Open defecation is a traditional practice but also a cultural taboo. People avoided public discussion of this subject, and it therefore has taken a back seat on the development agenda. Coupled with river diversion over time, faeces and effluent are flushed by rainwater into slow-flowing constructed lakes, where people fetch drinking water and fish.

Process management is alive and well in Ghana

By Judy Foote, HSBC Senior Communications Manager

Today I met Janet Asante, a formidable lady, the matriarch of an extended family who live together in Nkwaateng village.

The village has a population of 3,000, who are served by 4 boreholes, although during the dry season only one borehole bears water.

It is Janet who organises her family to make sure they are up early and get to the borehole before the queues (and fights) start.  She ensures the water they gather is placed in one large container for the whole family.

Meeting the next generation of Ghanaian engineers

By Ray Johnson

Show your support on World Toilet Day – 19 November

This World Toilet Day, 1 in 3 women worldwide risk shame, disease, harassment and even attack because they have nowhere safe to go to the toilet. Adequate sanitation would make 1.25 billion women’s lives safer and healthier. On 19 November WaterAid is releasing a powerful viral film showing a woman risking her dignity and safety trying to find somewhere to go to the toilet in her neighbourhood. WaterAid are asking people to watch this film and pledge their support for the 1.25 billion who live without a safe place to go the toilet.

Fountains of hope in Ghana

Ellie Tang, HSBC Water Programme Asia Pacific Regional Coordinator

In Ghana, the issues of water and sanitation have been overlooked by the government and the public. Open defecation is a traditional practice but also a cultural taboo. People avoided public discussion of this subject, and it therefore has taken a back seat on the development agenda. Coupled with river diversion over time, faeces and effluent are flushed by rainwater into slow-flowing constructed lakes, where people fetch drinking water and fish.

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