Business

Freshwater Watch inspires and empowers people around the world to make meaningful environmental change. As water experts, we know that we can only improve freshwater habitats by working together. That’s why we’re bringing businesses, governments, scientists, educators, the public and community groups together.

We offer our corporate partners a variety of opportunities to get involved, including:

  • events and programmes to engage employees with environmental issues
  • corporate sustainability learning and training programmes
  • projects and events to engage and empower local communities
  • freshwater research projects, furthering scientific understanding and exploring solutions to improving freshwater environments.

Partner opportunities

We are seeking new partnership opportunities. Find out more about how FreshWater Watch can work for your business.

Get in touch

FreshWater Watch with HSBC

During the awarding winning 8-year HSBC Water Programme, Earthwatch engaged over 8,000 HSBC employees through our sustainability training programme. This included hands-on citizen science using FreshWater Watch. Together, these citizen scientists contributed over 17,000 water quality data points across 36 cities worldwide, providing important evidence to inform freshwater management and policy and building their own understanding of the environmental challenges impacting fresh water.

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By combining classroom talks, group discussions about the Sustainable Development Goals and time outside the office measuring the water quality of two urban lakes in Bengaluru, we gained a complete, holistic perspective of the environmental challenges that we face. The course really inspired me and I will use the opportunity to inspire others.

Balasubramanian RajamaniVice President of HSBC’s Credit Analysis team in Bengaluru, India

FreshWater Watch with RBC

Earthwatch is working with Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) to expand the reach of FreshWater Watch in Europe. The partnership aims to tackle the challenges facing urban freshwater bodies and engage local communities and employees.

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During the project we have been able to bring FreshWater Watch’s WaterBlitz events to Dublin, Paris and Luxembourg, and enabled two-year research projects to be conducted in each city. During the last weekend-long WaterBlitz event, 688 citizen scientists collected water quality data points in Paris, Dublin and Luxembourg. This data helps local researchers pinpoint potential sources of pollution, and helps inform recommendations for the improved management of affected waterbodies. Taking part in the WaterBlitz and research projects has also enabled local citizens and employees to engage with local issues and learn more about the challenges facing fresh water.

Our partnership with Earthwatch is part of RBC Tech for Nature; a multi-year commitment to preserving our natural ecosystem. The WaterBlitz initiative encourages local communities to support their natural environment by understanding the health of their local urban waterbodies better. We are delighted to be contributing to this important environmental project.

Prue ThompsonHead of Marketing & Client Engagement at RBC

FreshWater Watch with Thames Water

The Thames Valley is the most densely populated area in the UK, as well as being home to lots of farmland. Because of this, the rivers that feed the Thames are under intense pressure from pollution. Earthwatch worked with Thames Water to engage local communities and empower them to monitor their local water bodies over time, helping to protect fresh water across the Thames Valley.

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The ‘Catchment Champions’, trained through this project, measured phosphate levels in ten locations across the catchment that were known to be prone to pollution. In these locations, they helped to assess the effectiveness of activities which aim to reduce phosphate levels in the river. The data they collect also contributed to the FreshWater Links database, helping researchers and policymakers understand water quality across the Thames Valley.

Image credit: John Hunt